Cindy Knight posted a very interesting comment a day ago about her recent observations (early October) of the Agates and Sloughs on the Northern Range. She consented to have it made into a post. It follows.

“I watched the Slough Creek and the Agate Creek Packs all last week and had some of the best and most exciting views in the nine years I have been wolf watching.

The Agate Creek wolves were on a carcass by the Yellowstone River, and after gorging themselves all day, were sleeping when a grizzly took over the carcass. The alpha female, 472, immediately tried to drive off the bear and was charged by the bear several times. The other four adults reluctantly joined in and surrounded the bear, but 472 was the only one engaging the bear. They all gave up as it was evident the bear was much more determined than they were.

The next day the Slough Creek wolves chased the Agate Creek wolves back to Speciman Ridge where they regathered with great energy and howling. LaterI saw that seven of the Slough Creek wolves, minus “Sharp Right,” were back in the Lamar Valley. I saw the Sloughs in the same area again the next day.

It is great to see them at the old Druid rendezvous site. The Druids themselves made an appearance that day near Round Prairie, we learned, and heard that there were 14 of them?

The next day we watched the Slough Creek wolves (with Sharp Right and minus a yearling) chase away the wolf Parenthesis from “Dave’s Hill,” and then wander around howling for their missing member.

Later we saw all of the Agate Creek wolves on Dunraven Pass up the Chittendon Road on a small kill. The grays’ head were covered in blood, particularly 113M. A young bull was watching and 472F ran up to chase him away, but he backed her off. She’s feisty. Everyone else was fat and sleepy. The pups and yearlings went down into some aspen. The adult grays remained on or near the kill.”

 
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About The Author

Ralph Maughan

Dr. Ralph Maughan is professor emeritus of political science at Idaho State University with specialties in natural resource politics, public opinion, interest groups, political parties, voting and elections. Aside from academic publications, he is author or co-author of three hiking/backpacking guides, and he is President of the Western Watersheds Project.

4 Responses to Recent Yellowstone Park wolf watching. October 2006

  1. avatar Jim Delaney says:

    Great info-thanks! “The Slough Pack chased away the wolf Parenthesis” ?? Not familiar with this…info please?

    It must be a new nickname for a uncollared wolf, but I am not familiar with it either. Maybe Cindy will give some info? Ralph Maughan

  2. avatar Dave Collins says:

    Parenthesis is a nickname for one of the unknowns . She is without her pack and was seen with one of the females from slough pack numerous times. She has not been seen as of late.

    Thanks Dave. I didn’t any of the “unknowns” were still around. Ralph Maughan 

  3. avatar Jim says:

    Why did Cindy say “14” Druids? I thought there were 4 adults and eleven pups?

    There 15 were several weeks ago. Maybe one died or was killed, or maybe it just wasn’t seen. Ralph Maughan

  4. avatar Chloe says:

    As of Oct. 15, there are still 15 Druids — 4 adults and 11 big pups. One member must just have not been seen “at the moment” when Cindy reported that 14 Druids were seen.

    Thanks for the update correction. RM 

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