Folks might be getting confused as to all the wolf bills that have been introduced into the current Wyoming legislature, move and bit, and then die.

Now another one is moving in the Wyoming state senate. This is the last week of the legislative session.

This, like the others, is most likely to be rejected by the US Fish and Wildlife Service if it becomes state law. It is yet another bill that would restrict wolves to a tiny area in Wyoming and take a completely hostile approach to wolves in general.

Story in the Casper Star Tribune. [State] Senate trims wolf management area. By Ben Neary.

Update. Feb. 28. Wyoming Senate passes wolf control bill; House up next. Billings Gazette.

CHEYENNE – The Wyoming Senate on Tuesday approved a wolf management plan that calls for giving the governor’s office authority to negotiate with the federal government over the boundaries of a permanent wolf area in the northwestern corner of the state.

. . . .

On Monday, the Senate had voted to exclude most private land from a permanent management area in which wolves would be managed as trophy game animals. Outside that area, they would be managed as predators that could be shot on sight.

Mitch King, regional director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Denver, had said Monday that any reduction of the management area his agency had proposed last fall would be unacceptable. He said a reduction would lead to his agency rejecting a state wolf management plan.

 
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About The Author

Ralph Maughan

Dr. Ralph Maughan is professor emeritus of political science at Idaho State University with specialties in natural resource politics, public opinion, interest groups, political parties, voting and elections. Aside from academic publications, he is author or co-author of three hiking/backpacking guides, and he is President of the Western Watersheds Project.

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‎"At some point we must draw a line across the ground of our home and our being, drive a spear into the land and say to the bulldozers, earthmovers, government and corporations, “thus far and no further.” If we do not, we shall later feel, instead of pride, the regret of Thoreau, that good but overly-bookish man, who wrote, near the end of his life, “If I repent of anything it is likely to be my good behaviour."

~ Edward Abbey

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