“U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid said Thursday that he’ll do everything I can to stop construction of three major coal-fired power plants in his home state of Nevada and will push for more alternative energy development.”

Reid had seemed to be neutral to leaning toward the coal plants. They are being proposed not because Nevada has a lot or coal or water, it has neither,  but it has a lot of clean air. Power companies apparently think this clean air is being wasted.

This is welcome news in the fight against global warming, curbing the mercury pollution that Nevada sends to neighboring states (from open pit gold mines), and keeping Nevada’s wide open spaces places where you can see for miles and miles.

Story By Brendan Riley. Reid Opposes Coal-Fired Plants in Nevada. AP

 
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About The Author

Ralph Maughan

Dr. Ralph Maughan is professor emeritus of political science at Idaho State University with specialties in natural resource politics, public opinion, interest groups, political parties, voting and elections. Aside from academic publications, he is author or co-author of three hiking/backpacking guides, and he is President of the Western Watersheds Project.

10 Responses to Majority leader Senator Harry Reid, now opposes Nevada coal plants!

  1. avatar skyrim says:

    A politician that “gets it”…………. Amazing!

  2. avatar Phillip Dunn says:

    Well skyrim you are wrong. If the distinguished senator from the great state of Nevada did “get it” he would offer up a little more than just wind and solar as alternative energy sources. How about nuclear? It is clean burning and even the French use it. Wind and solar are great for a house or business but not enough for an entire region of the country. But no Senator Reid has to pander to our segment of society that follows VP Al Gore in thinking the world is going to burn in 20 years. If he really wanted to do something for the environment he would help curb illegal immigration. Which, by the way, is the number “1” cause of urban sprawl. More people = more energy, and the need for open space. Senator Reid was correct about coal being bad for the air but instead of coming up with a realistic solution he defaults to his voting base.

  3. Phillip,

    Wind and solar should be deployed primarily for homes, business or neighborhoods . . . nothing wrong with that. It’s good.

    Huge, remote wind farms and solar complexes would have many of the severe impacts on the land and be subject to security concerns just like big coal, nuclear, gas and oil facilities.

    Terrorists are not going to target neighborhood or home solar power units, but it pays for them to target big complex facilities that have many significant weak points.

    Those to whom you say Senator Reid “panders” appear to be the large majority of the country, especially young people. Do you want some links to polling data?

  4. avatar kt says:

    Philip Dunn, do you live in the Interior West? It seems that this summer is showing just how prophetic Al Gore has been about Global Warming. And all that science says will happen is happening – only it seems much quicker than it was thought it would. Unprecedented heat, aridity … perhaps you should consider a holiday in this part of the world soon – say a nice trip to the Snake River Canyon to take in the shimmer of the heat waves … the crackle and crunch of the tinder-dry grasses and weeds …

  5. avatar skyrim says:

    Global Warming existed long before Gore brought it to the attention of the planet. Yes, their are consequences far beyond the ones that are on the table now, but when I see a statesman who actually has a conscience, I don’t view it as pandering. I choose to see it as wisdom, long delayed in most cases.
    I am powered with the sun as I write. No big deal but it gives me a little piece of mind and allows me to at least be a small part of the solution.

  6. avatar Phillip Dunn says:

    KT, believe it or not I do own property in the interior west and have visited it often. Your right it is hot especially since I live in Western WA. I have lived in many hot areas such as eastern CO, AL, GA, FL, and southern CA. In all of the places I’ve lived it has been hot from late spring to early fall with the exception of where I live now. Now in response to Ralph. I am all for solar and wind in fact my home in the interior west will be off the grid. I said nothing about terrorist but if you would like to go there I already gave you the answer to that. Immigration control. But neither of you responded about the population boom and how it effects our natural resources.

  7. avatar Phillip Dunn says:

    Skyrim, I don’t deny there is climate change and your right global warming has existed before VP Gore. But did you know that in the late 60’s to early 70’s there was talk of global cooling. And do you really believe as musician Sheryl Crow does that we should use one sheet of toilet paper when using the facilities and that it will help save the planet. But my point earlier was what are we to do about energy when we have more and more people coming here.

  8. avatar Phillip Dunn says:

    If Senator Reid wants to tell us about being energy efficient why won’t he roll up in a hybrid car when he goes to work or even better a news conference. He is the majority leader. He should lead by example. How about suggesting we go and buy light bulbs from IKEA that use 11 watts but put out 60 watts. Recycle or compost anyone? I have heard nothing from the Senator, just complaints about a powerful coal company who wants to purposely destroy the clean air of Nevada.
    I bet Senator Reid has never even hiked in his own backyard.
    He is a phony like most politicians.

  9. Oh, I think I posted in the wrong place… Please go to ‘Idaho fish and game”. Thanks!

  10. avatar Mary Jacobs says:

    Harry Reid is right. The state of Texas is leading the way with wind energy and Nevada should follow suit. It’s time for politicians to get out from underneath the oil and coal lobbies and support renewable energy. Our future health depends on it.

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‎"At some point we must draw a line across the ground of our home and our being, drive a spear into the land and say to the bulldozers, earthmovers, government and corporations, “thus far and no further.” If we do not, we shall later feel, instead of pride, the regret of Thoreau, that good but overly-bookish man, who wrote, near the end of his life, “If I repent of anything it is likely to be my good behaviour."

~ Edward Abbey

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