You don’t feed wolves like you do dogs even if the wolves don’t have to hunt.

Story about the wolves at the International Wolf Center at Ely, Minnesota. By Scott Stowell

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About The Author

Ralph Maughan

Dr. Ralph Maughan is professor emeritus of political science at Idaho State University with specialties in natural resource politics, public opinion, interest groups, political parties, voting and elections. Aside from academic publications, he is author or co-author of three hiking/backpacking guides, and he is President of the Western Watersheds Project.

2 Responses to Wolves need to gorge, even in captivity

  1. avatar TallTrent says:

    http://www.wolf.org/ is the website for the International Wolf Center. It’s a world-class facility. I’ve visited the center several times, most recently in March of 2007 before I moved out to Montana. The “Wolves and Humans” exhibit at the center was first put together by the Science Museum of Minnesota and does an excellent job of explaining wolf behavior, ecology, biology as well as the public perception of wolves. The captive wolves are healthy and obviously well-cared-for. They also have an intense and regular program schedule.

    When I was there in March I went to the special program during the feeding time. It was very interesting to watch the pack interactions after the keepers brought in two deer carcasses.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/talltrent/sets/72157600111341151/ has my pictures taken during that visit if you are interested in checking them out.

  2. avatar timz says:

    It is a great place. I took the wolf ethology course they teach there in conjunction with a local college and was able to spend almost a week there doing field work to complete the course. Lori Schmidt, a wildlife biologist and the wolf care-taker does a great job there.

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‎"At some point we must draw a line across the ground of our home and our being, drive a spear into the land and say to the bulldozers, earthmovers, government and corporations, “thus far and no further.” If we do not, we shall later feel, instead of pride, the regret of Thoreau, that good but overly-bookish man, who wrote, near the end of his life, “If I repent of anything it is likely to be my good behaviour."

~ Edward Abbey

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