Wyoming’s wolf free-fire, “wolves-are-vermin” zone killed delisting-

We can’t say this for certainty, but Judge Molloy’s decision which caused the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to throw in the towel for the time being on wolf delisting, had its origins in orgy of wolf killing in Wyoming immediately after the wolf was delisted.

This is the argument made 9-28 in the poorly headlined article by Julie Cart in the LA TImes. Delisting Endangers Wolves.

My opinion is the tip-off that wolf 253M (“Limpy”) had been shot was event that led the media to cover the suddenly legal, lethal assualt on wolves near Daniel, Wyoming and vicinity. He truly was one of the most important wolves to live . . . and especially to die.

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About The Author

Ralph Maughan

Dr. Ralph Maughan is professor emeritus of political science at Idaho State University with specialties in natural resource politics, public opinion, interest groups, political parties, voting and elections. Aside from academic publications, he is author or co-author of three hiking/backpacking guides, and he is President of the Western Watersheds Project.

6 Responses to How ID-WY-MT lost their "coveted" wolf delisting

  1. avatar Denise Johnson says:

    Yes Ralph,
    In life and in death…he will always be remembered.
    Nothing is in vain.

  2. avatar catbestland says:

    On a related note, from the Centers for Biological Diversity…

    “a federal judge today overturned a 2007 Bush administration decision to remove Great Lakes area wolves from the endangered species list. The ruling puts an immediate halt on the killing of hundreds of wolves in Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin.”

  3. Brian Ertz just posted it. Thanks!

  4. avatar John says:

    Allowing wolf hunting would not have changed many stubborn views on the wolf anyway. It would just legalise hatred, giving it an opportunity to spread and undo all the efforts made to educate people about the wolf’s role in the ecosystem.

  5. avatar Cindy says:

    As I sat up above the Druid rendezvous site this weekend, watching the pups play and sleep and sleep and play, I
    thought of dear Limpy as I’ve done so many times. I bowed my head and graciously thanked God for his life and now am
    starting to feel a sliver of hope through his death. I get this
    isn’t my childhood pet but a very wild and capable animal. We’re asking only for the rules to be fair and I am confident the wolves will take it from there. After all responsibility is
    part of their DNA, just watch a pack with their new pups sometime…
    Wolf Howls Always,
    Cindy

  6. avatar Terry says:

    I agree with you Cindy that the rules were unfair. The guns and rifles were taken into hand as soon as the delisting was put into effect. How could they win or even stand a chance. It was kill on sight….and Wolf 253 was one of the unfortunate victims. His memory will not fade away and this courageous wolf will be long remembered. His death was not in vain. Along with all the other wolves that were killed in such a short time, it showed the powers that be the fact that they could all be exterminated again. Also that their numbers and gene pool hadn’t progressed to a sufficient amount to warrant delisting and that Fish and Wildlife had made a terrible mistake. Thank God for the wisdom of Judge Molloy.
    I too have sat many hours in the Lamar Valley and have been blessed to see and hear the Druids and Slough Creek Packs. It is just so exciting and wonderful. Saw them in January and also when I was there Sept. 20th. Will be going back for two weeks the end of January and pray to witness their splendor again. They know what family and working together is all about. We could take a lesson from them.

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‎"At some point we must draw a line across the ground of our home and our being, drive a spear into the land and say to the bulldozers, earthmovers, government and corporations, “thus far and no further.” If we do not, we shall later feel, instead of pride, the regret of Thoreau, that good but overly-bookish man, who wrote, near the end of his life, “If I repent of anything it is likely to be my good behaviour."

~ Edward Abbey

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