GPS collared wolf from Paradise Valley that roamed 1,000 miles through Southeast Idaho, Wyoming, Utah now in Colorado

Yellowstone wolf visits Colorado. Associated Press.

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Ken Cole

Ken Cole, Buffalo Field Campaign‘s Executive Director, is a 5th generation Idahoan, an avid fly fisherman, wildlife enthusiast, and photographer. He was formerly the Idaho Director for Western Watersheds Project.

26 Responses to Yellowstone wolf visits Colorado

  1. avatar Brian Ertz says:

    This is why it’s so important that wolves have more time.

  2. avatar Ky Girl says:

    I told my son about this & his immediate response was “Is it kin to Limpy?!?!?!?”

    An amazing journey for this animal – I hope it can find a mate & set up housekeeping someplace safe!

  3. avatar Jeff N. says:

    This is good news. I’m taking this thread off topic but does anybody (Ralph) have any further information on the 5 +/- wolves that were supposedly seen by a pilot in UT near the WY-UT border? If I remember correctly, I believe this observation was made in the past year or so.

  4. I never heard anything more. I like to think they just lost track of them and some are still out there.

  5. avatar Davej says:

    Is she a grey or black? A little more difficult to use the “I thought it was a coyote when I pulled the trigger” story with the blacks.

  6. avatar Rick Hammel says:

    I remember reading something about this about Summer 07, in Dutch John, Utah. Dutch John is the town where the operators of Flaming Gorge Resevoir live. Fishing guides who guide on the Green Riveralso live here. But I have not heard anything further for some time.

    Rick

  7. avatar Jeff N. says:

    Thanks Rick/Ralph,

    Here’s to hoping they are living and muliplying under the radar somewhere in the Uintas and surrounding environs.

  8. avatar Barb says:

    Maybe the legislators have Mad Cow Disease; more likely. 🙂

  9. avatar Barb says:

    sorry — wrong thread! (it’s late)

  10. avatar Kestrel says:

    Now if we can just get Carolyn Sime to send a few more down here, we’ll have ourselves a party!!

  11. avatar Dave Ausband says:

    DaveJ
    The MT disperser now in CO is gray.

  12. avatar Barb says:

    Just wondering…. what laws would it break (if any) for private individuals to dart and then move wild wolves from other states into Colorado? Would that be considered harrassing wildlife?

    And the answer is NO — I am not thinking of doing it.

    🙂

  13. avatar Save bears says:

    Barb,

    It would violate the Endangered Species Act! Which could be punishable by jail time and major fines…You can’t harass any wildlife, especially those that have ESA status, come on you can’t be that naive!

  14. avatar Barb says:

    I was wondering which specific laws it would violate — other than the ESA.

  15. avatar Barb says:

    Wolves are not protected under the ESA in Alaska, SaveBears.

  16. avatar JB says:

    Barb:

    31 ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT OF 1973 Sec. 9
    “PROHIBITED ACTS
    SEC. 9. (a) GENERAL.—(1) Except as provided in sections 6(g)(2) and 10 of this Act, with respect to any endangered species of fish or wildlife listed pursuant to section 4 of this Act it is unlawful for any person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States to—
    (A) import any such species into, or export any such species
    from the United States;…
    (D) possess, sell, deliver, carry, transport, or ship, by any
    means whatsoever, any such species taken in violation of subparagraphs…”

  17. avatar Barb says:

    OK. Still, since they’re not protected in Alaska, but ARE protected in the state they conceivably could be transported TO, the ESA would therefore apply?

  18. avatar JB says:

    Sorry; I should also add that many states have prohibitions on the possession and transport of endangered species.

  19. avatar Barb says:

    JB — wolves are NOT protected under the ESA in Alaska. They are not considered “endangered species” in Alaska. So it would be like darting a racoon and transporting it over state lines. Are there laws against that? Would someone need a permit or license for that?

  20. avatar Barb says:

    My thoughts were if a conservation organization wanted to bring in wolves to a state where they ARE considered “endangered,” if they got the wolves from Alaska, what laws would prevent them from doing it?

    Would it be legal to “bring” an animal (that is NOT ESA protected as in Alaskan wolves) into a state where it IS ESA protected and just let it go free?

  21. avatar ProWolf in WY says:

    To bring this back on topic, regarding the wolf in Colorado, how much progress has been made (in the forms of petitions, etc.) to reintroduce wolves (or grizzlies) into the Southern Rockies? As a resident in the extreme southern part of Wyoming, I am very much interested and do find it to be good news that particular wolf made it into Colorado, too bad she didn’t have a gentleman caller.

  22. avatar JB says:

    Barb says: “wolves are NOT protected under the ESA in Alaska. They are not considered “endangered species” in Alaska. So it would be like darting a racoon and transporting it over state lines.”

    Please go back and read the text I provided, which comes from section 9 of the ESA. Forget it, I’ll just re-post:

    “…it is unlawful for any person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States to…(A) import any such species into, or export any such species from the United States;…
    (D) possess, sell, deliver, carry, transport, or ship, by any means whatsoever, any such species taken in violation of subparagraphs…”

    (1) First darting and transporting a raccoon is illegal in many states without a permit. Raccoons carry raccoon rabies and everybody’s favorite group to hate, the USDA/WS, has an active program attempting to stop the spread of this disease.

    (2) Second, Alaska law (similar to most states) forbids the possession and transportation of live game (the definition of “game” includes wolves). Here:

    5 AAC 92.029—Permit For Possessing Live Game “(a) No person may possess, import, release or export, or assist in importing, releasing, or exporting, live game, unless the person holds a possession permit issued by the department.” “(c) The department (of Fish and Game) may not issue a permit for the capture, possession, import or export of any game animal, including a hybrid of a game animal and a species listed in subsection (b) for use as a pet.”

    (3) Third, even if the state of Alaska gave you a permit, you would still be breaking the law; the ESA expressly forbids the possession and transportation of endangered species; wolves might not be endangered in Alaska, but as soon as you crossed into any other state, you’d be breaking the law.

    (4) It is unclear to me, but assuming you drove from Alaska to the contiguous U.S. through Canada, you might also be violating the ESA’s provision against the exportation/importation of endangered species. Additionally, you’d be subject to Canadian law, which I have neither the time nor compunction to look up for you.

    So, if you want to dart wolves in Alaska and reintroduce them into Colorado, you’ll need a permit from every state (and likely every province) you pass through, as well as a permit from the FWS.

    Good luck!

  23. avatar Barb says:

    🙂

    My daughter, who is 14 and loves wolves, asked me about this and I was curious how that might (or not) work — 🙂

  24. avatar Ken Cole says:

    You might have said so in your original question.

  25. avatar Sarah Judson says:

    A few years ago, a lone (black) wolf was caught on video near Walden (northwestern Colorado) and I’ve heard that wolves have been seen in Rocky Mountain National Park. One was also killed by traffic on I-70. So they are starting to make a comeback. It might take awhile for them to find each other.

  26. avatar Erika says:

    wow, this is amazing… what an icredible trip for this animal. I wonder what made it want to travel so far, land? establishing a family/pack? (:

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