State Parks Dept. to stay. No parks will close. They will cost more-

Otter suffered a big defeat on his plan to hand the parks over to the State Lands Department. Nevertheless, things won’t be the same in the Idaho Parks Dept. or inside the Parks.

Thunderstorm over Harriman State Park. Photo copyright Ralph Maughan

Here is the editorial view of the Idaho Statesman and some details. Our View: Parks get a reprieve, at a cost Idaho Statesman

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About The Author

Ralph Maughan

Dr. Ralph Maughan is professor emeritus of political science at Idaho State University with specialties in natural resource politics, public opinion, interest groups, political parties, voting and elections. Aside from academic publications, he is author or co-author of three hiking/backpacking guides, and he is President of the Western Watersheds Project.

6 Responses to Idaho Statesman editorial: [State] Parks get a reprieve, at a cost

  1. avatar Maska says:

    Fantastic photo, Ralph! It looks three-dimensional. Thanks.

  2. avatar Maska says:

    ” Fee increases will vary from park to park, said Otter, who cited popular Ponderosa State Park near McCall as an example of a higher-performing park.”

    Seems like Idaho needs a “higher-performing” governor.

  3. avatar JB says:

    “It will eventually fall to park users to pay the bills – and it will fall to park directors to devise a fee structure that brings in the bucks but doesn’t drive off the visitors.”

    Sadly, this is happening all over the U.S. Parks and recreation are the first thing to go in tough times. And to pay for a lack of governmental support (i.e. taxpayer $$), we turn to a “pay-to-play” model.

  4. avatar Salle says:

    It reminds me of the early 1970’s when the first school programs to be cut were the cultural type, like music and art classes along with phys. ed.

    Time may change some things, it doesn’t seem like the politicians learn anything over time though.

  5. avatar JB says:

    Salle:

    Once upon a time I studied to be an art teacher; I was even certified k-12 for a short time. However, I saw the “writing on the wall” (i.e. how little art educators were appreciated and how art classrooms were used as a dumping ground for children with legitimate behavioral disorders). Needless to say, I didn’t last long. From one dead end career to another, I suppose.

  6. avatar Salle says:

    JB

    Interesting. I was an aspiring artist, both visual arts and performing arts. Accomplished talent-wise all these years later, I have no illusions of ever making a living at any of it. Those who either witness my performances or see my other works like them a lot. At least I have the knowledge that they are somewhat appreciated and that I’m not just blowing it out my a#*. Every piece of pottery I produced spent time in a gallery…

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‎"At some point we must draw a line across the ground of our home and our being, drive a spear into the land and say to the bulldozers, earthmovers, government and corporations, “thus far and no further.” If we do not, we shall later feel, instead of pride, the regret of Thoreau, that good but overly-bookish man, who wrote, near the end of his life, “If I repent of anything it is likely to be my good behaviour."

~ Edward Abbey

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