Governor Otter intervenes at last minute to dim hopes of settling 37 year old Idaho Wilderness controversy-

Below a prominent Idaho Statesman political columnist weighs in to Otter’s sorry move. Considering Otter’s last minute actions to turn once supportive congressional Republicans against this fairly good and delicately balanced bill, I am reminded of Otter’s position on wolves.  We can certainty trace the change from partial compromise on the Idaho wolf issue to one of nasty divisiveness to one man — Butch Otter. Thinking of all the other non-outdoor related things he has done, I think he’s Idaho worst governor, even including legendary “dumb” Don Samuelson back in the day.

Kevin Richert: Otter writes his sorry wilderness legacy. By Kevin Richert. Idaho Statesman.

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About The Author

Ralph Maughan

Dr. Ralph Maughan is professor emeritus of political science at Idaho State University with specialties in natural resource politics, public opinion, interest groups, political parties, voting and elections. Aside from academic publications, he is author or co-author of three hiking/backpacking guides, and he is President of the Western Watersheds Project.

4 Responses to Kevin Richert: Otter writes his sorry wilderness legacy

  1. avatar jon says:

    As bad as Butch has been in some people’s minds, Idaho should thank god for Rex Rammell not becoming governor.

  2. I don’t like to campaign for anyone here, but Otter does have a Democratic opponent who could beat him given the wide dislike of all incumbents.

    His name is Keith Allred. He has an uphill battle in such a red state. He is certainly no liberal. He doesn’t seem to be so much part of good ‘ol boy system that Otter is the product of. He is smart (of course that’s a fatal personal defect in some political circles today).

    This is not an endorsement.

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Quote

‎"At some point we must draw a line across the ground of our home and our being, drive a spear into the land and say to the bulldozers, earthmovers, government and corporations, “thus far and no further.” If we do not, we shall later feel, instead of pride, the regret of Thoreau, that good but overly-bookish man, who wrote, near the end of his life, “If I repent of anything it is likely to be my good behaviour."

~ Edward Abbey

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