Niemeyer’s Memoir Wolfer Addresses The Societal Hatred Of Lobos-

Among those who follow the wolf controversy most are now familiar with the name “Carter Niemeyer.”  He is one of the few who walks right down the middle, which nowadays likely means he gets it from both sides.

Todd Wilkinson produces the Wildlife Art Journal has a fascinating interview with Niemeyer in the latest issue. As A Federal Agent, Carter Niemeyer Killed Wolves For A Living. We are not sure if this premium article will be available gratis on the web for a while.

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About The Author

Ralph Maughan

Dr. Ralph Maughan is professor emeritus of political science at Idaho State University with specialties in natural resource politics, public opinion, interest groups, political parties, voting and elections. Aside from academic publications, he is author or co-author of three hiking/backpacking guides, and he is President of the Western Watersheds Project.

14 Responses to Carter Niemeyer reflects on his career and his life since “Wolfer” was published

  1. Hi Ralph, I’ll leave it up gratis for the next several days for anyone who wants to have a look…..

  2. avatar Jon Way says:

    Great interview…

    It is important to note that WY, IMO, isn’t really to blame for their awful wolf mgmt plan – I put more blame on spineless Ken Salazar (and USFWS) for not putting his foot down but instead keeping his *&()&) cowboy hat on and trying to be one of the good old boys…

  3. I think Carter makes an excellent point about wildlife biologists that are afraid to speak up and tell it like it is. By hiding and not speaking out, in fear of losing their jobs, biologist do great harm to wildlife. I had IDFG biologists ask me to bring up certain subjects when I served on the Idaho Bighorn/Domestic Sheep Working Group. “Too close to retirement to risk rocking the boat” was one excuse I heard.

    • avatar Ralph Maughan says:

      I’ve heard that too, Larry. It is a general problem in the United States. One result is a great diminishment of free speech because even though you won’t be jailed for what you say, you can lose your job for the most trivial things you say that offend your employer.

      The 1% (and others)know this, and it could be argued this is one reason they keep the recession from ending.

    • avatar timz says:

      So do you guys suppose that’s why Gamblin comes on here and consistantly repeats the same old tired B.S.?

  4. avatar Cindy says:

    I’m looking very forward to hearing Carter speak here in Jackson on Monday night. I have not read the book yet. Since one of the most important goals I have in my wolf advocacy work is to be able to talk with those I disagree with, in hopes of working out better avenues for managing wolves here in Wyoming, I want to hear how Carter has managed this balancing act. As I keep telling fellow friends of wolves, being silent just isn’t an option, even more so after Wyoming passes this faulty plan. I can say I now have a talking relationship with the biggest anti-wolf person in the Valley, something I never thought I’d be able to do a few years ago.

  5. avatar Cindy says:

    I’ve been meaning to read the book since it came out and haven’t had (taken) the time – it’s a must now, maybe even over the weekend.

    • avatar Immer Treue says:

      Once you start it, tough to put it down. If at all possible, read it before you hear Carter speak. Might help yield a bit more insight.

    • avatar Elk275 says:

      Cindy,

      I heard Carter speak at the bookstore, I purchased the book, he signed it and I went home and read it non stop. After listening to Carter speak and a short visit, he is different than what some people on this blog believe. The first thing that he said “let’s get something straight, I’m a gun owner, a hunter and a trapper”. He is 6’5″ and dominates the room, he is in control.

      • avatar Daniel Berg says:

        He is a dominating figure. I’m 6’4″ 220 and he appeared to have every bit of an inch and 30 lbs on me.

        He went through a lot of stats and slides when he spoke in Olympia at a bookstore. I think people were more interested in his stories.

  6. avatar Cindy says:

    Well I’m a tough ole’ Wyoming Gal who’s spent many hours in meetings recently listening to some pretty rough and tumble ranchers and hunters who hate hate hate wolves. And since this is not a Defenders or Sierra Club talk (which I attend as well) I expect him to shoot from the hip so to speak. I admire the fact he respects the animal and the science enough to talk publically about how important their presence is in this ecosystem.

  7. avatar timz says:

    Speaking of talks Otter gave one in Horseshoe Bend the other day and in his typical clownlike fashion was quoted in the Idaho World (Boise County’s weekly wipe) in response to a question about “the Canadian wolves introduced by U.S. F&W Service.” “He said “the Sportsmen was an important management tool for the wolf. Electronic calls are now allowed.” He said with a laugh, “We can’t bait em…yet!” The article further states “F&G estimates there are between 12,000 and 13,000 wolves in Idaho.”
    Gamblin, did you tell them that?

  8. avatar Vicki S says:

    As I wrote to Mr. Niemeyer in a recent email, last spring while climbing out of the Black Canyon of the Yellowstone after a four-day trek, our guide recommended Wolfer as a good read. I was appalled when I found out it was written by a former Wildlife Services guy, and procrastinated to both buy and read it. I’m an avid reader and have to say Wolfer is the best read I’ve had in a long time. A real eye opener in every sense. I bought a copy for our local library here in ranching country in Colorado. I’m also sending a copy to our good Sec. of Interior Salazar just for yucks. You never know.

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‎"At some point we must draw a line across the ground of our home and our being, drive a spear into the land and say to the bulldozers, earthmovers, government and corporations, “thus far and no further.” If we do not, we shall later feel, instead of pride, the regret of Thoreau, that good but overly-bookish man, who wrote, near the end of his life, “If I repent of anything it is likely to be my good behaviour."

~ Edward Abbey

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