Tracks and remains of prey found-

The search for the four wolf-like animals spotted from the air in northeastern Utah has not found the animals, but it has found five pair of tracks.  In addition remains of several wild animals possibly fed on and maybe killed by the canids, have been found. These dead wildlife were spotted by air by following the tracks of the possible wolves. A crew will visit the area on the ground and look for scat. If any scat is found,  it will be subjected to DNA analysis. This will tell if they are wolves.

The canids might be wolf hybrids, but this is doubtful because the formation of a pack of five wolf hybrids is unprecedented. Also, a clear migration route to the area from NW Wyoming is patently obvious. The route has been followed by lone wolves in the past to northern Utah.

Associated Press story. Air search turns up tracks, but no wolves in Utah

 
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About The Author

Ralph Maughan

Dr. Ralph Maughan is professor emeritus of political science at Idaho State University with specialties in natural resource politics, public opinion, interest groups, political parties, voting and elections. Aside from academic publications, he is author or co-author of three hiking/backpacking guides, and he is President of the Western Watersheds Project.

14 Responses to Possible wolves in Utah not found, but their tracks are

  1. avatar Sav says:

    The state of Utah is surely upset these wolves have grabbed media attention. If they hadn’t they would already be gone. It proves the importance of reporting wolf sightings to media outlets rather than state wildlife officials. This is great news and a great wild and rugged area for these wolves to call home. Plenty of elk, deer, moose and bear.

  2. avatar Peter Kiermeir says:

    ALLPHIN: Wolves in Utah, it’s inevitable
    “What I fear,” continued Banks (a local genius), “is that because these wolves were originally (those in Yellowstone) raised in captivity, they have no fear of humans. It’s only a matter of time before someone gets hurt.”
    http://www.heraldextra.com/sports/other/allphin-wolves-in-utah-it-s-inevitable/article_1c242810-6e3e-51d1-8915-7c63ac0a2309.html#ixzz1ozEUyxXM
    And I always thought they were parachuted out of black unmarked helicopters in the middle of the night………

    • avatar Ralph Maughan says:

      How old is writer Allphin anyway? In his article, he writes, “I was raised with stories my father told about having to protect a harvested elk from wolves southeast of Jackson, Wyo., when he was a young hunter.”

      The first wolves that showed up and stayed in Jackson Hole was in 2000. If his father encountered wolves SE of Jackson and had to defend his elk kill from them, Don Allphin would now be 12 years old, at the oldest.

    • avatar Alan says:

      “We’ve been seeing wolves at least once a month for the past year or two,” Banks said. “There could be seven or more of them in the area.”
      Yet, surprisingly, no one has had to defend any elk carcasses; nor have any little girls been eaten alive at grandma’s house! Amazing!

  3. avatar Jeff says:

    I thought the same thing when I read the article. I believe the last wolves in WY were killed in the 30s in the Owl Creek Mtns on the north side of the Wind River Reservation. So if his father was born in 1900 he might have seen wolves in the late teens early 20s at best. But then again he thinks the Yellowstone wolves were pen raised—is this better or worse then being Canadian Wolves?

    • avatar Peter Kiermeir says:

      Worst case: How about pen raised giant Canadian Wolves?

      • avatar Ralph Maughan says:

        Genetically engineered United Nations wolves, smuggled through Canada, and trained to violate the property rights of Western land barons.

    • avatar Salle says:

      I think his papa was tellin’ some perty tall tales about wolves. Tall tales= reality for some…

    • avatar Alan says:

      “But then again he thinks the Yellowstone wolves were pen raised——”
      You mean they don’t put the animals in Yellowstone back in their pens at night? Shocking! Don’t they know that thousands of families with little kids camp there every summer!!

      • avatar Peter Kiermeir says:

        No problem, they are remote controlled, you know (that´s why most of them wear collars!) out of that famous yellow SUV.
        Hey, we´ve just invented a new myth!

  4. avatar Mooseboy says:

    Being from the state of Utah I am so excited that wolves who are native here might finally be back. What I love is how the possible wolves are in a part of the state where they are federally protected, which is much deserved slap to the face of the Utah State Legislature who operate on mostly fear and paranoia. They wanted to eliminate sex education in public schools(vetoed by the Governor thank goodness)in the past session, I can’t even imagine what these crazies are dreaming up for wolves who they I’m sure they believe eat humans on a regular basis and hate Mitt Rommney. 🙂

  5. avatar Louise Kane says:

    It now makes me sad, instead of excited, to think that wolves will move into a territory that is so extremely hostile to predators. Its hard to joke about the ignorance because that ignorance is killing so much wildlife so effectively. This country desperatly needs a predator protection act and revised wildlife management agencies and policies.

  6. avatar skyrim says:

    A bit more speculation on these animals:
    http://www.ksl.com/?nid=148&sid=19665915

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