Send public comments now on new EA for predator damage management by Wildlife Services in Idaho-

USDA’s Wildlife Services in Idaho is writing a new environmental analysis (EA) on how to manage damage by predators in Idaho. It will replace all existing EAs.

According to the announcement, “Predator species involved in the majority of conflicts and damage in Idaho which will be addressed in the EA include badgers; black bears; black-billed magpies; bobcats; common ravens; coyotes; feral/free-ranging dogs and wolf-dog hybrids; grizzly bears; mountain lions; raccoons; red foxes; and striped skunks.  Other predators in Idaho that have historically caused only localized damage on an occasional basis include American crows, feral/free-ranging cats, long-tailed weasels, mink; short-tailed weasels, and spotted skunks.  Predation by wolves and fish-eating birds are addressed in separate EAs and will not be included in the new EA.” [boldface ours]

Folks frequently criticize Wildlife Services for their management activities with these animals, which many people hold near and dear. So this is a chance to respond. They write: “WS has tentatively identified alternatives for involvement in predator damage and conflict management in the state and issues which should be considered in the new EA. The agencies are seeking your input, and issues or concerns you may have regarding 1) the Idaho WS’ involvement in PDM; 2) PDM alternatives which should be considered; and 3) any other relevant information and data you believe should be considered in the analysis”

Here is a link to their complete announcement. Comments are due Jan. 15.

Wildlife Services was forced to do this EA by threat of a suit by Western Watersheds Project and three other conservation organizations. See earlier story about this. http://tinyurl.com/new3ot9

 

 
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About The Author

Ralph Maughan

Dr. Ralph Maughan is professor emeritus of political science at Idaho State University with specialties in natural resource politics, public opinion, interest groups, political parties, voting and elections. Aside from academic publications, he is author or co-author of three hiking/backpacking guides.

7 Responses to Predator Damage Management in Idaho

  1. Our government has been taken over by a gang of psychopaths. Everyone and everything has become a target to bomb,shoot or torture. The sale of guns, especially assault weapons, is at an all time high. Why? Because everyone is scared to death of our own government.
    Wildlife Services is just following the lead of the serial killers that have inhabited the White House for the past 14 years.

  2. avatar Yvette says:

    Thank you, Ralph. I’ll definitely prepare comments and spread this around so others may do the same.

  3. avatar Ida Lupines says:

    WS has tentatively identified alternatives for involvement in predator damage and conflict management in the state and issues which should be considered in the new EA.

    Wow, this is huge! With the states so eager to take up wildlife ‘management’ on their own, they really don’t need WS anymore, and American taxpayers don’t want to contribute to killing wildlife.

    Thanks to Western Watersheds, Friends of the Clearwater, et al for getting things done!

  4. avatar frank renn says:

    Predator species involved in the majority of conflicts and damage in Idaho. Feral/free ranging dogs made this list.
    Other predators in Idaho that have historically caused only localized damage on an occasional basis. Feral/free ranging cats made this list. Appears that domestic cat predation on small birds is not a priority with W.S.

  5. avatar Gary Humbard says:

    If you comment make sure you cite your sources, and the information is as current as possible. If you want a change in predator management, provide an argument how the current predator management adversely affects the balance on the landscape while giving alternatives that are better choices.

    Too many times individuals and conservation organizations that are critical of government agencies, only condemn their actions, but do not provide specific better options and back it up with scientific information. Lets make sure this does not happen on this EA.

    • avatar Randy Fischer says:

      Thanks for your insight in regards to offering effective comments…I believe everyone wants to deliver an effective comment. Free of wishful thinking but full of science.

      Many Americans have not been exposed to a complete ecosystem, much less the science required to support the predators or exterminate them.

      The varied wealth of science and information that many of you possess is astounding, and I am one who would like to encourage a display of the many aspects that might be applied to the subject of damage control. What is pathetically redundant to some of you may just fill in the blanks, for others.

      How about a chain of posts where all of you chime in on any “scientific” tangent regarding the (why what when and how) science of predators. Both sides of the controversy. Links, papers, all of it to strengthen a comment.

      Dont be so humble, please start the chain now.

      • avatar Pamela W says:

        Great idea to share scientific justification for actions we desire.

        I have to admit, though, that I am of two minds on this. I understand the point that we need to provide detailed alternatives in order to have our comments be effective, but there’s another part of me that is outraged. It’s their fxxking job to figure this out. They are the supposed experts. But I do understand that their expertise is killing and that anything outside that realm leaves them clueless. I don’t know yet what I’m going to say in my comments, but I shudder to think of endorsing either Wildlife Services or Idaho Fish & Game as the lead on anything.

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‎"At some point we must draw a line across the ground of our home and our being, drive a spear into the land and say to the bulldozers, earthmovers, government and corporations, “thus far and no further.” If we do not, we shall later feel, instead of pride, the regret of Thoreau, that good but overly-bookish man, who wrote, near the end of his life, “If I repent of anything it is likely to be my good behaviour."

~ Edward Abbey

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