Texas right wing religious nut in Idaho to scam delegates-

Ted Cruz, the most immoderate person running for President, is in Idaho stumping for Republican delegates to be chosen in their March 8 primary election.

It is not impossible that Ted Cruz could win enough delegates to throw the Republican convention into brokering a candidate. He could also win it outright. As of today, he is not very far behind Trump in delegates.

As Cruz said in his losing bid in Nevada, he is telling us here in the Gem State that our U.S. public lands should be returned to the states. That is 62% of the land area of Idaho. Cruz says this though these lands were never part of Idaho or any state. Even more significantly, he said “better yet” the lands should all be private. This, of course, is the way it is in Texas where he comes from.

I have always had doubts about Texas and its bragging about its size and superiority. From when I first encountered hordes of Texans crowding out native Coloradoans in the public lands there, Texas has always seemed to me like a place where everyone but the super rich have to walk inside the lines. There is no freedom of access to the land. It’s a big state, but so what? Do we want to be like Texas?

Cruz has an odd sense of freedom. Folks have to understand that he is a Christian dominionist for whom freedom means turning our country into a theocracy where a handful of right wing Christian sects and denominations would rule and the rest of us would have to bow to their false god. For real and potential tyrants, freedom has always meant doing what you are told by the enlightened one or enlightened few. Maybe we could hide out in the hills, but under Cruz we would be trespassing on what was our open land.

Cruz and the Texas elite don’t understand the West. Their ideas are alien. Their billionaire-backed movement to privatize the public lands is just as bad as occupation by a foreign power. Maybe if Trump gets to build his wall it will go on the north border of Texas. 😉
. . .
In Idaho, Cruz says feds should transfer public lands to states, private interests. Spokesman-Review

Ted Cruz attacks Donald Trump for wanting to leave public land in feds’ hands. Politifact

 
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About The Author

Ralph Maughan

Dr. Ralph Maughan is professor emeritus of political science at Idaho State University with specialties in natural resource politics, public opinion, interest groups, political parties, voting and elections. Aside from academic publications, he is author or co-author of three hiking/backpacking guides.

65 Responses to Ted Cruz tells Idahoans federal lands belong to the states or (mostly) private

  1. avatar Barb Rupers says:

    This is the comment I posted earlier on the Spokesman Review article:

    One can not give back that which was never part of a state’s property. The US bought the Lousiana Purchase, and aquired other lands in the west by conquest, purchase, or treaty. It was never part of the territorial states land base. The US gave away millions of acres of the west in the homestead act, mining claims, railroad grants – much of which ended up in the hands of current timber companies such as Weyerhaeuser who has recently started charging for hunting on corporate lands in SW Washington as has Potlatch in Idaho.

    If you don’t like public land I suggest you move out of the west to some place like Texas.

    • avatar Ralph Maughan says:

      Barb, I didn’t see your comment before writing my post, but they are so similar folks might think I copied.

    • avatar Jim Davis says:

      Agree, but US acquired western lands under the Louisiana Purchace Treaty, signed by Jefferson, confirmed by the Senate.

  2. avatar Rita k Sharpe says:

    By far, the Republicans read like a gothic novel or some horror film that keeps playing over and over again. What an assortment of candidates we have in the Republican Party and with Cruz, one could be dancing with the devil, and if he wins, we could lose a lot more than our soul,our public lands and anything else we hold dear.

  3. avatar Ida Lupines says:

    You’re right – what a nightmare! It’s spreading.

    Ted Cruz Pulls Off Surprise Win in Maine GOP Caucuses

    Many are against a new national park in Maine, for the usual reasons:

    Technically, this Idaho-shaped chunk of land, which contains a 30-mile stretch of the International Appalachian Trail, is known as the East Branch Sanctuary.

    http://www.outsideonline.com/1900811/fight-create-americas-newest-national-park

  4. avatar Chris Harbin says:

    I suppose it’s too late to deport Cruz back to Canada. His appeal to the sage brush people is really an attempt to incite an insurrection. Such actions by a sizable chunk of the republican party have been increasing and they need to either called out for it if nothing else.

    • avatar R. Green says:

      As a Canadian, happy in our displacement of our own Pasty Destroyer Herr Harper, I do not accept any suggestions that Cruz and his insipid brand of moistness be returned here. We might have birthed him, but he’s a product of you guys. 😉

  5. avatar Kropotkin_Man says:

    I find it hard to comprehend that Mr. Cruz’s ideas are considered by many as mainstream. Specifically the ideas of Christian supremacy and control of the masses by corporate giants. I’m not a dyed-in-the-wool fan of control by the government. But according to current Rep. doctrine, the only role of the government should be to tax the people and then funnel the monies over to private hands via one mechanism or another. Charter schools i.e. unregulated schools and so called defense contractors being two examples. Privatization of public lands is another.

    So, it’s not so much a matter of less control but control by the hierarchies of industry and the church. Hierarchies are undemocratic in any form but especially in the form of large corporations. At least in the form of government, we the people have the façade (illusion)of voting for those we wish to be in power. Perhaps the lesser of two evils but it’s better than no voice at all. I part ways with many of my fellow anarchists on this point but I live in the real world and am willing to call it a day and go home with at least a few crumbs of liberty.

  6. avatar monty says:

    The founding fathers would be shocked at the number of low information voters. Some of these right wing religious nuts believe that Jesus gave this country to the white man. Is it possible to have a democracy when the majority are brain washed with nonsense? I agree, Cruz is worse than Trump!

    • avatar WM says:

      Equally as troubling to me (perhaps others) is how little knowledge is required to become a naturalized citizen in this country and ultimately to vote:

      The Test: Oral (so the applicant does not really need to be able to read or write) > 100 possible questions in the test > citizenship applicant is asked UP TO 10 questions and must get 6 correct. Some are incredibly simple. Is it possible for the administering official to coach the applicant, by question selection or answers, even subliminally? And, of course, it doesn’t have to be in English.

      I had no reason to look at the test questions until today: https://www.uscis.gov/citizenship/teachers/educational-products/100-civics-questions-and-answers-mp3-audio-english-version

      or here is the flash card version: https://www.uscis.gov/sites/default/files/USCIS/Office%20of%20Citizenship/Citizenship%20Resource%20Center%20Site/Publications/PDFs/M-623_red_slides.pdf

      or in Spanish or a half dozen other languages.

      Sort of makes me feel like an informed voter doesn’t really count for much.

      Question 59. Who lived in America before the Europeans arrived

      Questions 89. What ocean is on the west coast of the United States?

      Question 99 When do we celebrate Independence Day?

      There are a bunch more just as challenging.

      • avatar rork says:

        Folks becoming citizens doesn’t seem like a big problem to me. I may be biased cause the city where I work (Ann Arbor), and the big one nearby (Detroit), have thousands of foreigners that I would beg to become citizens. I see the kids at U Mich every day. The children of the people who so easily became citizens crowd it. Many have beautiful minds, and will benefit, defend, and adorn my country. I admit choosing who we invite is good, and we’ve gotten really lucky in the past about who came. You might contend that where I am the Lebanese, Iranians, Cubans, Africans, Indians, Pakistani’s, Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese, Saudi’s, Japanese, etc were exceptional, and that’s true, but I’ve seen it with Hispanics in WA too. Those kids became judges, principals, doctors, engineers and such too.
        I fear letting folks work here (by pleading necessity) and not letting them get to try at citizenship. I’ve seen it in Germany. I don’t like it. It creates an underclass. It is a caste system.

      • avatar TC says:

        WM – that’s not concerning. I know more than a few naturalized citizens, and I find most of them to be very knowledgeable about American history and quite engaged in politics and trying to figure out where candidates stand on issues important to them. In fact, I’d take the average naturalized citizen over the average natural-born citizen in both categories. I find them much less likely to be polarized, brainwashed, and locked in to voting for a letter (D/R) instead of a person with vision, insight, a platform, and qualifications. Give the same quiz to your average Joe or Jane on the street. Then ask them who they support in this campaign, and more importantly, why. Be prepared to be very disappointed. Or heck, just watch the returns come in. I fear we are getting just what the collective we deserve.

        • avatar WM says:

          TC-
          I think every voter regardless of whether they are naturalized or born in the US ought to be required to take a citizenship test before being allowed to register to vote. Such a test ought to be at least 2X as hard as the naturalized citizen referenced test and cover the same topics. We are producing a crop of idiots coming out of high schools these days, to add to number of those who have already passed thru (or not graduated or have no GED), who, in large part, don’t really deserve to live here, even though it is their right of birth.

          I know literacy tests have a sordid history and purpose (illegal according to the federal courts when applying civil rights laws), but at some point we have to as a country require more of our citizens demonstrating basic knowledge of our government and geography before bestowing the voting privilege which is at the very essence of democracy. I didn’t say that very well, but I think you get the idea.

          And, maybe there is even a reasonable argument to be made that all voting ballots be in English. And that is certainly worth a national discussion, not just at the state/county level.

        • avatar Ida Lupines says:

          You might want to vote for ‘a letter’ because you believe in the party values. I used to try to pick the best qualified candidate no matter what side of the aisle they were on, and sometimes still do (it is becoming increasingly rare these days). But I find that the general party values are more important – all of the ‘qualifications, platform, wisdom and insight’ are questionable to me if the candidate doesn’t share my values, or come close to sharing them. Sometimes a compromise has to be made, for sure, but not party.

          • avatar Ida Lupines says:

            For example, there used to be a political animal called the ‘moderate Republican’. But I think they may be bordering on extinction, as are very hard to find these days. The pendulum has swung to conservatism.

      • avatar Louise Kane says:

        WM,

        Almost without fail, the immigrant people I have worked with nationally and internationally have a much better grasp on our politics and history than Americans.

        I have great admiration for the courage it takes to come to a new country and learn the language while entering a work force and new culture.

        When I lived in Washington DC, I traveled frequently. I used to take taxis all the time. I’ll never forget speaking to a colleague on the phone while in a taxi. I treated the taxi driver with courtesy, but indifference. While in the taxi, I was speaking to a friend about a complicated legal issue I was dealing with. When I finished the conversation, the man driving the taxi offered a spot on quiet observation. I was startled but asked him how he came to his conclusion. He explained in halting English that he was a lawyer in Pakistan and that he had been studying the American legal system.

        From that time on, I always asked my drivers where they were from, why they came to the US and whether they like it here and or missed their homes. Without exception, most were former professionals, often highly educated, and highly motivated to make America home. Most sent home money to their families. Over the years, I watched several build a transportation mini empire.

        For many years, I kept notes and hoped to produce a documentary about the taxi drivers I met and their backgrounds. I met so many talented, super educated, humble people who entered the US because they were refugees or seeking asylum, or a better life. Among the taxi drivers were surgeons, physicians, electrical engineers, scientists, former business owners. They held PhDs, Masters degrees, MBAs. Common denominators and goals included peaceful lives, crazy devotion to their families back home, humility and a willingness to work without complaint at the most menial of jobs.

        Did you ever watch Jay Leno? He used to stop people in the street and ask questions like when was the American Revolution or Civil War? Or he might say, “how long has Madeline Albright been the vice president” (trick question for most) and you would not believe how ordinary citizens (many of them college students) answered.

        Conversely, My (East Indian and Korean) friends hold multiple Phd’s, teach economics in prominent colleges and understand American history better than most. Other peoples that I work with regularly or include in my friendships are West Indians, Portuguese and Brazilian, Polish, Jamaicans and Dominicans (which are populous on Cape Cod), and Eastern European peoples. Without exception they are thrilled to be here, they work their butts off, they are honest and reliable.

        In contrast, some of the locals drink too much, don’t show up on time, are overly entitled, surly, opinionated without basis and generally and ironically complaining about the immigrants.

        I’m not worried about the incoming peoples and their lack of education. They want to learn. It’s the purposefully uneducated, intellectually stagnated, reality television addicted, who are confused about the ability of reality stars or proselytizing religious fanatics and their suitability to serve in the highest office of the US that really scare the s out of me.

        Of the many informative films exposing the myths behind immigration, I’d recommend this one, Harvest of the Empire http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2072987/plotsummary?ref_=tt_ov_pl

        This film reminded me how many immigrants landed here because of US interventionist policies that helped to decimate their countries political and economic stability.

        When I think of El Salvador, the Iran Contra scandal, the puppet regimes we have supported I could be very ashamed.

        • avatar WM says:

          Louise,

          Sorry I don’t have time to comment on your lengthy post more. But, I think maybe, to some degree, some of us here run in different circles than the average new immigrant to America. I, too, know folks with such credentials, compelling stories of flight from a homeland. Some individuals are successful, but many are not. And, I can put you directly in touch with pockets of Hispanics in Eastern and Western WA who really don’t want to learn. Biggest issue on their minds is whether they can afford the next largest size big screen TV. And, forget about learning the language. Not even a blip on the radar.

          And, yeah, since it appears I make the same queries as you, I have my own cab stories to tell from many different big cities. One memorable one from years ago was told on the way from DC to Dulles, so there was plenty of time for the details. And, one of our cab companies here in the Seattle area is run by Indian Sikhs. Do you think they will hire Hispanics, Chinese, Eastern Europeans or other Whites?

    • avatar Marc Bedner says:

      If this election campaign would shock the founding fathers, it would be because they tried their best to establish a republic, not a democracy where anyone could vote. Perhaps they actually knew what they were doing!

      • avatar Mal Adapted says:

        Marc,

        Perhaps the founding “fathers” did know what they were doing when they limited “popular sovereignty” to male landowners, and excluded women, native Americans, and slaves(!). Do you think that’s how it still ought to be? Speaking as a male landowner of (mostly, we think) Northern European descent, I’m glad our Constitution apparently provided a way for all adults to win the franchise no matter where their families they came from or when they arrived, whether the founders intended it or not. After all, it’s not like my “anglo” genes make me superior to anyone else.

        Clearly the founders, by seeking to “secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity”, weren’t worried about economic externalities of liberty like anthropogenic global warming, which nevertheless places our Posterity in serious doubt. I’m not suggesting that any other form of government would necessarily do better, nor am I sure that Plato knew what he was doing when he wrote “Until philosophers are kings, or the kings and princes of this world have the spirit and power of philosophy, and political greatness and wisdom meet in one, and those commoner natures who pursue either to the exclusion of the other are compelled to stand aside, cities will never have rest from their evils” either, even substituting “science” for “philosophy”. Let’s keep in mind that many learned scholars of history consider the totalitarianism of Hitler and Stalin to have been inspired by Plato’s idea of Utopia.

        In general, I think Churchill knew what he was doing when he said “Many forms of Government have been tried, and will be tried in this world of sin and woe. No one pretends that democracy is perfect or all-wise. Indeed, it has been said that democracy is the worst form of Government except all those other forms that have been tried from time to time.” I sometimes wonder if my fellow Americans aren’t determined to prove Sir Winston half-right, though.

  7. The steal our public lands crowd seems to be driven by religious crazies. Cruz and all of the Utah and Idaho Mormon politicians seem to be reading from the same book. I went to the Utah presentation on “how to steal our public lands” to the Idaho house and senate in Boise last week. They sounded just like Cruz. The Idaho legislators that spoke were on the same page. They all sounded like Cliven and Ammon Bundy.

    There are too many Mormons leading this steal the public lands posse for this not to have the blessing of the Mormon Church leadership.

  8. avatar Yvette says:

    It was an accident to have my last name on my post. If you can delete that I would appreciate it. If you can’t it isn’t the end of the world.

  9. avatar Nancy says:

    Yvette,
    Please try and repost your comments. You had some good links re: Cruz and Sanders 🙂

    • avatar Barb Rupers says:

      I missed Yvette’s comment – where did it go?

      • avatar Rita k Sharpe says:

        She did have some good links on her post. She accidently put her whole name on the post,which she didn’t want or desired and Mr. Maughan kindly removed it. I could be wrong for I have been wrong before.

        • avatar Yvette says:

          This is the first chance I’ve had to come back.

          I had stated that with me being in Oklahoma that I see how most people are either regular church goers, grew up in church, or simply expect being Christian, especially evangelical, to be the norm. Growing up I’ve been to church with friends and I have personally witnessed people get touched on the head and then fall over backward and pass out. I’ve witnessed people thrashing on the floor talking in tongues. That was not normal behavior in my world, but for many others it is.

          The mainstream GOP and the media is primarily focused on Trump and keeping him out, but Cruz is in the background. To me, Cruz is more concerning than Trump. The reason he scares me more than Trump is that Cruz is accepted as normal by the many Christians. That scares me because he and his megachurch preacher father believe he is the anointed king that will ‘transfer the wealth’ in the end days. As bizarre as that may sound to you and I, it is accepted as real by many Christians and tolerated by many others.

          Cruz will take our public lands if given the chance. I suspect it is all part of the ‘transfer of wealth’ ‘end of days’ plan. This video will show how concerning the Cruz’s and all the evangelicals that follow them can be. http://theconservativetreehouse.com/2016/01/17/ted-cruzs-father-my-son-anointed-to-take-control-of-society/

          The following two links show Bernie Sanders position on animal rights and welfare, wildlife, and environmental issues.

          http://www.ontheissues.org/2016/Bernie_Sanders_Environment.htm

          http://feelthebern.org/bernie-sanders-on-animal-welfare/

          Sanders is the best choice for our public lands, our wildlife, and the welfare for farmed animals.

          • avatar Ida Lupines says:

            Thank you, Yvette. Going to read right now.

            • avatar Ida Lupines says:

              I feel spirituality is important, but not organized religion. It’s important, at least to me, to be humble about our place in the world, and to question. But the negatives of religion are the kind of stuff that will not go away, and we’ve certainly got a shameful history in this country.

              Nobody needs to be converted, or saved, by anybody else. The lands belong to all of us, and unfortunately we must make the best of things by working together today after a terrible past. Most beliefs have more in common than not – so I never have been able to understand all the strife because of it. I guess we humans just will use any excuse for violence and domination.

          • avatar Louise Kane says:

            Agreed with most Yvette but Sanders voted for the Sportsman Act, that really concerned me that and his gun stances. God help us if Trump or Cruz won the presidency. It seems impossible but if you really want to scare to scare yourself look at the voter turn out in the primaries and compare GOP to Democrat voters. Democrats can’t afford to be lazy. I plan on going to DC with some friends to canvas for Dem voters this fall. We need to make sure people vote. I can’t remember a time when I was more frightened by the candidates and their potentially destructive and regressive ideas.

          • Religions are all bizarre. The Jews think they are “Gods Chosen” and that they are destined to rule the world. The rest of us are cattle to be used by the Jews.. The Christians think the Jews are wrong and that the way to heaven is through Jesus Christ and that they will rule the world. . The Mormons think that the Jews and other Christians have lost their way and only the Mormons have the “true church” and the vision to rule the world.. The Muslims think that all of the other religions are wrong and that all non believers should be killed. All of the above think that a theocracy with their sect in charge is preferable to a democracy.
            All of them see other living things as something to be used by man. “End Times” and “Latterday” themes preach that the world is coming to an end and that taking care of this earth and our fellow travelers is not a priority.

            • avatar WM says:

              When are people going to realize there is really very litte “separation of church and state.” Organized religion is a way to control the masses, and to acquire wealth (and thus economic and political power) in the name of the Church. Some religions just do it differently, but the Catholic Church has been able to do it for Centuries – beginning with the Papal states in the 8th Century. And, in the New World, Spain and its Conquistidors exploited the native populations of Mexico and parts of South America with the aid of the Catholic Church, spreading the “Word of God” to the heathens, while enslaving them to extract gold and silver. Modern day Mormons have huge economic wealth, not easily unveiled due to secrecy, and there are also very wealthy church members who have done business with the church or others, similar to what the Japanese call a keiritsu in the business world.

              Muslims, it would appear, focus the faithful on the afterlife to seek political and cultural obedience in this one, I think.

              • avatar Immer Treue says:

                “When are people going to realize there is really very litte “separation of church and state.” Organized religion is a way to control the masses, and to acquire wealth (and thus economic and political power) in the name of the Church.”

                Bingo!

                • avatar Louise Kane says:

                  +1o the quote
                  organized religion responsible for the worst wars, heinous crimes on native peoples, and barbaric treatment of peoples opposed to the tenants of one religion or another. There is something really bizarre about the structure of organized religions and rigid unyielding adherence to the leaders of the church. The only “church” i have been able to relate to is Unitarian, they are more like social activists committed to embracing all, striving for intellectual curiosity, acceptance and social and environmental justice and peaceful assembly.

              • avatar Yvette says:

                ++++ WM.

          • avatar Mareks Vilkins says:

            such abhorrible behavior should be prosecuted by law

            “Cruz Says He Sings “God Bless America” While Making Patriotic, Christian Love”

            https://thelapine.ca/cruz-says-he-and-heidi-sing-god-bless-america-while-making-patriotic-christian-love/

  10. avatar Jeff says:

    The founding fathers unfortunately would not be surprised one bit, that is why we don’t directly vote for president and originally senators either. I hope Idaho voters send a resounding NO to Cruz since he has made turning federal lands over to the states a central issue in his western campaign. I hope that most westerners cherish the USFS and the BLM and only the isolated wing nuts who feel like they losing control of their historic domain support Cruz and his ilks plan.

  11. avatar Ida Lupines says:

    Donald Trump I find amazingly entertaining. It’s almost as if he’s deliberately upsetting the applecart of the GOP. You can see how he became top dog in the neighborhood and a captain of industry, but I don’t see him as presidential.

    When Cruz won Maine:

    “I’m not surprised he won Maine because it’s near the border of Canada.”

    and

    “Little Marco” Rubio. Priceless.

  12. avatar monty says:

    There are no moderate republicans running for president. They are all anti-choice, deny the scientific consensus on climate change, oppose comprehensive immigration reform and Trump, Cruz and Carson are borderline crazy. Right-wing radicals define the agenda of the Republican party.

  13. avatar Kayla says:

    Now in my opinion, Cruz is a nutcase pure and simple! His wife worked for Goldman Sacs – a banker, so look between the lines – enough said! And personally I would never vote for anyone who was NOT born in the U.S. itself. And Cruz was born in Canada. Also Rubio was NOT born within the U.S. Plus with Cruz wanting to give so much of the public land to the states, then where would that leave us who love to get out and hike and camp in the deep wilds. Cruz would be a disaster. But on the other side, I am NOT a bigtime Socialist like Bernie Sanders is. If one looks at the environmental record of all Big Government Socialist – Communist Countries, there environmental record is Not Good! Often they give everything to big industry and the citizens of that country have no voice in the matter but must go along.

    Personally do believe that human civilization has gone the wrong course for centuries with being nothing but focused on economics for centuries. Rather one is a conservative or a liberal, it is always ‘Just About The Money’! This also seemingly includes many an environmentalist unfortunately! And one cannot build a lasting society on the False Gods of the Flesh! One of these days something will happen which will make humankind the endangered species of the world. And in my own personal opinion, this day cannot come soon enough.

    How many administrations have come and gone on both sides of the political sphere of things but that backcountry here and there is just as pristine as ever, as up in the very headwaters of the Yellowstone. In these days how few even are willing to venture into the backcountry because they would have to give up all of their techno devices. Do personally think all of the old hunter-gatherer societies had it right rather it was the Native Americans, the Aborigines in Australia, or the Bushmen in Africa. And in the political parties, is it always ‘Only About Economics’, and us Human Two Leggeds staying in their economic society box that they have created for us. All of my life have I ventured out into the deep wilds for months at a time. And all of my life have I been criticized for it. Since it is an election year, it is even a better time to just head into the deep wilderness and leave all of this freaking insane human society behind rather it is run by the conservatives or the liberals. They all are freaking insane in my opinion – just all for the big bankers of the world.

    To end … an old saying on a sign at the end of a road in Wyoming …. ‘At The End Of The Road Where The Trails and Life Begin!’

    Wishing Everyone the Best!

    • avatar Yvette says:

      Kayla, take a look at Bernie’s voting and legislative history for wildlife and domestic animal protection, land protection, water protection, ecosystem protection, etc. Seriously, if you care about land an wildlife please study how he actually voted on the issues. If you care about wildlife, the environment, and public land then Bernie is your man.
      http://www.ontheissues.org/2016/Bernie_Sanders_Environment.htm

      http://feelthebern.org/bernie-sanders-on-animal-welfare/

      • avatar timz says:

        Yes but when he steals all my money to give to some punk kid to go party for free at some liberal arts college I’ll no longer be able to give to real causes like WWP.

      • avatar Kayla says:

        Yvette, how about Doug Suelo! He was a man who quit money. He lived outside of Moab for many years and walked away from money in 2002, and lived without money period. Now rather it is Ted Cruz or Donald Trump to Hillary Clinton or Bernie Sanders, their idea for society is still a society focused first of all where the foundation of everything is ‘All About The Money’. Does any of them advocate or even letting people who desire to, have a Hunter-Gatherer lifestyle, letting people who desire to then do so with living free outside the human money oriented lifestyle just with the Mother Earth and all other lifeforms like all of the old Hunter-Gatherer groups in the past. Nope! It is more then just being environmentally and wildlife friendly. Do you know that in many socialistic countries in the past, one was required by law to work and could not jump out of the system and if not then imprisonment. How many Hunter-Gatherer groups have been forced – forced to give up their lifestyles for the military industrial complex. It is also becoming an advocate of the future with being a world without ‘Money or Economics’. Rather it is Fascism – Right Wing Conservatism, Left Wing Socialism, or Communism … it is still All About The Money and then all Humans living in the box in which the Masters made for us to live in rather if we want to or not. For years have wandered in the wilderness and have been criticized by how many on Both Sides of the Political Fence. Personally do think that the right place of us Humans is in the role of things was as Hunter- Gatherers or Gatherer-Hunters. And in my opinion one of these days, the Mother Earth will give a little shake and the few remaining ones will have no choice but to go back and live in the old ways with the Mother Earth without any money or economics period!

        Wishing You the Best!

      • avatar Louise Kane says:

        I’m usually with you Yvette but I’m torn on this one. I believe that money in campaigns is extremely corrupting at least the kind that is raised in super pacs and through corporate donors. Yet, but I dislike his stance on guns, and his vote for the sportsman act that would enable/promote trapping and hunting on public lands is a real negative for me.

  14. avatar Louise Kane says:

    Obama’s Supreme Court nomination…

    From Wikipedia
    “Main articles: Merrick Garland Supreme Court nomination and Barack Obama Supreme Court candidates
    Garland was considered twice for the Supreme Court (in 2009 and in 2010) before ultimately receiving a nomination in 2016.[30] In 2009, following the announcement by Justice David Souter that he would retire, Garland was considered as one of nine finalists for the post, which ultimately went to Sonia Sotomayor, then a judge of the Second Circuit.[31] After the April 2010 announcement by Justice John Paul Stevens that he would retire, Garland was again widely seen as a leading contender for a nomination to the Supreme Court of the United States.[32][33][34] President Barack Obama interviewed Garland, among others, for the vacancy.[25] In May, Senator Orrin G. Hatch, Republican of Utah, said he would help Obama if Garland was nominated, calling Garland “a consensus nominee” and predicting that Garland would win Senate confirmation with bipartisan support.[35][36] Obama nominated Solicitor General of the United States Elena Kagan, who was confirmed in August 2010.[25]

    On February 13, 2016, Justice Antonin Scalia died.[37] Within a day after Scalia’s death was reported, Senate Republicans, led by Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, issued an unprecedented, categorical vow not to consider any nominee put forth by Obama, saying that a Supreme Court nomination should be left to the next President.[38][39][40][41] On March 4, the New York Times reported that Garland was being vetted by the Obama administration as a potential nominee. A week later, Garland was named as one of three judges on the President’s “short list” (along with Judge Sri Srinivasan, also of the D.C. Circuit, and Judge Paul J. Watford of the Ninth Circuit). Obama interviewed all three leading contenders, as well as two others who were considered, Judge Jane L. Kelly of the Eighth Circuit and Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia.[42] On March 16, Obama formally nominated Garland.[43][44] The president’s nomination of Garland, the New York Times reported, effectively “dar[ed] Republican senators to refuse consideration of a jurist who is highly regarded throughout Washington.”[43]”

  15. avatar Louise Kane says:

    should have been posted on interesting news thread, my apologies.

  16. avatar Ida Lupines says:

    Honestly, after all this, even Atlas doesn’t even care who you vote for.

    🙂

    The Prius – I’m shocked.

  17. avatar Outdoorfunnut says:

    Interesting post and perspective on Ted Cruz Ralph. I thought he was more about conservatism than hallelujah……. Where I come from a little hallelujah is a good thing. ;o)

  18. avatar skyrim says:

    “Texas right wing religious nut in Idaho to scam delegates”

    And it seems that he scammed a fair number of ’em…….

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‎"At some point we must draw a line across the ground of our home and our being, drive a spear into the land and say to the bulldozers, earthmovers, government and corporations, “thus far and no further.” If we do not, we shall later feel, instead of pride, the regret of Thoreau, that good but overly-bookish man, who wrote, near the end of his life, “If I repent of anything it is likely to be my good behaviour."

~ Edward Abbey

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