Alaska’s offer of $150 for each wolf killed under its predator control program is nothing more than an illegal bounty and should be stopped immediately, conservation groups said Tuesday in court filings. Full story in the Casper Star Tribune. By Mary Pemberton. AP

Alaska’s new governor wants a lot more wolves killed than were killed this winter, so she has implemented $150 for each wolf killed as an “incentive.” The Alaska state legislature revoked all bounties in the state a number of years ago. The groups say calling a bounty “an incentive” doesn’t mean it isn’t a bounty. It seems like the groups are easily correct.

 
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About The Author

Ralph Maughan

Dr. Ralph Maughan is professor emeritus of political science at Idaho State University with specialties in natural resource politics, public opinion, interest groups, political parties, voting and elections. Aside from academic publications, he is author or co-author of three hiking/backpacking guides, and he is President of the Western Watersheds Project.

One Response to Three groups ask judge to kill Alaska governor's new bounty on wolves

  1. avatar Gigi Halloran says:

    I’m not sure who will be reading this comment–hopefully someone in Alaska who matters. Wolves are intelligent, majestic animals who should be preserved, not killed, especially with the incentive a bounty. Please stop this despicable practice as soon as possible.

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‎"At some point we must draw a line across the ground of our home and our being, drive a spear into the land and say to the bulldozers, earthmovers, government and corporations, “thus far and no further.” If we do not, we shall later feel, instead of pride, the regret of Thoreau, that good but overly-bookish man, who wrote, near the end of his life, “If I repent of anything it is likely to be my good behaviour."

~ Edward Abbey

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