The photos (from Western Watersheds project).

 
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About The Author

Ralph Maughan

Dr. Ralph Maughan is professor emeritus of political science at Idaho State University with specialties in natural resource politics, public opinion, interest groups, political parties, voting and elections. Aside from academic publications, he is author or co-author of three hiking/backpacking guides, and he is President of the Western Watersheds Project.

2 Responses to 31 "before and after" livestock grazing photos

  1. avatar entropy hed says:

    A couple of thoughts…

    I’m not saying that grazing doesn’t affect the condition of the locations in these photos, I’m certain it does. Possibly dramatically, but I’d be interested to see two variations of these photos. A meadow in the same area on the same dates with no grazing so I can see the natural changes in the vegetation across the seasons, and/or the same location taken on the same date the following year to see how much year over year damage has been done. Otherwise I think what could be dramatic evidence of a problem can be easily dismissed as normal seasonal changes.

    I’m not familiar with these areas (although I have spent some time in the Eastern Sierra) and this is just the first thought I had when viewing the pictures and noticing the dates. I am not an expert by any account, just an interested troll =)

    Good luck with your work.

  2. I was thinking of that too — from spring to autumn on a stream ungrazed by livestock.

    I will suggest that to Western Watersheds.

    Thanks.

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‎"At some point we must draw a line across the ground of our home and our being, drive a spear into the land and say to the bulldozers, earthmovers, government and corporations, “thus far and no further.” If we do not, we shall later feel, instead of pride, the regret of Thoreau, that good but overly-bookish man, who wrote, near the end of his life, “If I repent of anything it is likely to be my good behaviour."

~ Edward Abbey

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