New website: Sarah Palin’s Predator Holocaust. This was done by the Bear Viewing Association

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Ralph Maughan

Dr. Ralph Maughan is professor emeritus of political science at Idaho State University with specialties in natural resource politics, public opinion, interest groups, political parties, voting and elections. Aside from academic publications, he is author or co-author of three hiking/backpacking guides, and he is President of the Western Watersheds Project.

14 Responses to New website: Sarah Palin's Predator Holocaust

  1. avatar John says:

    Whilst I agree with what is said on the site – especially Alaska’s outright slaughter of predators – it is not ‘detached’ enough to be taken seriously.

    It takes more than a few enlightened individuals to change things.

  2. avatar Ryan says:

    This has been going on pre Palin and will be going on post palin. Its called the state looking out for the Majority of its residents.

  3. avatar JB says:

    Ryan,

    You must be kidding? How is killing bears and wolves “looking out for the Majority” Alaska’s residents?

  4. avatar John says:

    70, 000 Alaskans ignored, thrice.

  5. avatar JEFF E says:

    Ryan says,
    “This has been going on pre Palin and will be going on post palin. Its called the state looking out for the Majority of its residents.”

    Kinda like the majority of Wyoming residents are against wolves, eh.

  6. avatar Barb says:

    jeff E – – Then Wyoming needs to come up with a realistic and viable — not “shoot on sight!”

    It’s that Wyoming arrogance — like Dick Cheney saying he doesn’t have to make any of his notes accessible to the public because he ‘reports to the U.S. constitution.’

    My as– he reports to the constitution. Last I understood, his salary was being paid by the American people.

    But… the real question…. what is he trying to hide?

  7. avatar Ryan says:

    “70, 000 Alaskans ignored, thrice.”

    In favor of 500,000 alaskans.

  8. avatar John says:

    Incorrect.
    It was a majority vote against the aerial gunning of predators.

  9. avatar John says:

    Need I also add the international disapproval of these practices, as well as the bad reputation that follows quickly afterward?

    Not many people know that Alaska is one of the few places that does not respect the sanctuary of National Parks either.
    Here’s the clincher too, the Alaskan Board of Game does not have one biologist working for them who has the spine to speak out against such flawed culling programs.
    The state allowed the sale of over 2000 moose tags last year and still they have the gall to state that there is a crisis.

    If you shoot a wolf to save a moose, then shoot the moose: you’re either insane… or in Alaska.

  10. avatar Ryan says:

    John,

    There is a fundamental flaw in your logic.. First of all only non residents even have to buy a moose tag.. Secondly do you have any clue how big AK is? If there biologists aren’t speaking out about it, maybe they agree with it? The only hunting allowed in National parks is subsistence or LE, that being said there are more National parks and wildlife refuges in AK (as far as size) than any place in the US.

    Let me ask you this, why should Alaskans care what international people who have never been there think?

    Prove your majority quote too while your at it?

    If your going to run your mouth, get your facts straight before you start..

  11. avatar timz says:

    Looks like majorities too me.

    1996 — Year Alaska voters passed a ban on aerial hunting of wolves except in a “biological emergency”
    58.6% — Total “yes” vote on that ban
    1999 — Year the Alaska Legislature removed the “biological emergency” restriction on aerial wolf hunting
    2000 — Year the Alaska Legislature re-legalized aerial wolf hunting by private individuals, over Gov. Tony Knowles’ veto
    6 — Months that elapsed before Alaska voters in 2000 overturned the Legislature’s action and restored the previous ban on aerial hunting
    53% — Total “yes” vote to restore the previous ban on aerial wolf hunting

    2003 — Year that the Alaska Legislature and Governor Murkowski re-legalized aerial wolf hunting by private individuals

  12. avatar JEFF E says:

    Ryan says,
    “If your going to run your mouth, get your facts straight before you start..”

    Now that right there is funny s*** coming from Ryan.

  13. avatar Salle says:

    Yup, Cheney with lipstick.

  14. avatar John says:

    National Parks are National Parks, Ryan. Places reserved for natural events to unfold untouched by humans.
    How many there are or how big the state is should not make any difference to what they stand for. Alaska’s tourism industry for international citizens is one of the key industries of the state. Big money in seeing living animals, not dead ones. And its not just seeing the animals that eco-tourism has to offer. Annoy the tourists and you lose that source of major income.

    Tags: Last time I checked, wasn’t it a legal requirement to have one regardless of where you are from?

    As for the ‘maybe they [biologists] agree’, its the fear biologists have for their jobs.
    Manipulation of herbivore populations whilst the population is stable is not ecologically sound and causes a devastating effect on the landscape. Culling of predators because they have caused this stabilisation and hunters need a destabilised ecosystem to have a ‘decent harvest’ (set at a high level) is just plain anti-environment.
    Anyone with a brain can tell you that, its not rocket science.

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‎"At some point we must draw a line across the ground of our home and our being, drive a spear into the land and say to the bulldozers, earthmovers, government and corporations, “thus far and no further.” If we do not, we shall later feel, instead of pride, the regret of Thoreau, that good but overly-bookish man, who wrote, near the end of his life, “If I repent of anything it is likely to be my good behaviour."

~ Edward Abbey

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