Biofuel crops can be a big threat to wildlife, or not, as this article shows-

Biofuel Grasslands Better for Birds. Science Daily.

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About The Author

Ralph Maughan

Dr. Ralph Maughan is professor emeritus of political science at Idaho State University with specialties in natural resource politics, public opinion, interest groups, political parties, voting and elections. Aside from academic publications, he is author or co-author of three hiking/backpacking guides.

5 Responses to Biofuel Grasslands Better for Birds Than Ethanol Staple Corn, Researchers Find

  1. avatar JimT says:

    Not only is a grasslands biofuel better for the ecosystems we have lost and trying to restore, it is a much more efficient process in terms of energy in, energy out. Of course, there is no agribusiness lobby for native grasses…except maybe here in Boulder….:*)

  2. avatar Josh says:

    “Not only is a grasslands biofuel better for the ecosystems we have lost and trying to restore, it is a much more efficient process in terms of energy in, energy out. Of course, there is no agribusiness lobby for native grasses…except maybe here in Boulder….:*)”

    Better for the ecosystem except for the fact that it is still based off of the continuation of a system that is based upon a cancerous growth that is unchecked and unlimited. It does little good to look towards one thing that will possibly save one part of the Earth when the entire biosphere is collapsing around us. The continuation of Western Civilization in general spells nothing but ecocide. Even as we all see the fact that there are mass unexplained die-offs happening, that habitat destruction is constant, that climate change is accelerating to a frightening level, the left continues to cling to the hope that we will be saved by the very technologies that cause these problems in the first place. How much death and destruction does it take before you all open your eyes to seeing that the system itself is the cause of the problem and needs to go. To act as if we can benefit the natural world while living in a system which is completely removed from it and at odds with it is naive as it is dangerous.

    • avatar JimT says:

      We have to learn to walk before we run, Josh. Adaptation will be necessary as we…the world…learn to live without or with minimal fossil fuel usage. I never see efforts to progress from a corn based system that uses more energy that it produces to one that is more efficient, and may possibly lead to a restoration of grassland ecosystems…

  3. Funny. There is no such thing as cellulosic ethanol. The EPA keeps rolling its mandate for it back because nobody can make it profitably. Try to by a gallon of it. Saw an article last year where a corn farmer was planning grow grass instead if it is more profitable to do so.

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‎"At some point we must draw a line across the ground of our home and our being, drive a spear into the land and say to the bulldozers, earthmovers, government and corporations, “thus far and no further.” If we do not, we shall later feel, instead of pride, the regret of Thoreau, that good but overly-bookish man, who wrote, near the end of his life, “If I repent of anything it is likely to be my good behaviour."

~ Edward Abbey

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