Currently viewing the category: "Logging"

I’ve been studying fire ecology for decades, an interest which led to the publication in 2006 of my book WIldfire: A Century of Failed Forest Policy. My interest in wildfire did not end with the book and I have continued to read and digest the fire-related literature, attend conferences, and most importantly visit and observe [...]

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The Supreme Court recently ruled in an 7-1 vote (Justice Stephen Breyer recused himself) that the EPA regulations about water pollution as mandated by the Clean Water Act did not apply to sediment and other pollution from logging operations. The timber industry is rejoicing over the ruling.  But citizens should be less sanguine than industry. [...]

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I am the Lorax, I speak for the trees.

It seems more and more there are fewer conservation organizations who speak for the forest, and more that speak for the timber industry. Witness several recent commentaries in Oregon papers which are by no means unique. I’ve seen similar themes from other conservation groups in the [...]

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‎”At some point we must draw a line across the ground of our home and our being, drive a spear into the land and say to the bulldozers, earthmovers, government and corporations, “thus far and no further.” If we do not, we shall later feel, instead of pride, the regret of Thoreau, that good but [...]

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Collaboration is all the rage. How it has worked in Montana-

Past stories here at The Wildlife News have not been very friendly to the process called “collaboration”  although we have not written about it for a while.  That does not mean it has disappeared nor become friendly to conservation of our forests, grasslands, sage [...]

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Tiny herd spends most of its time in British Columbia-

The woodland caribou have been on the endangered species list for a long time, several million dollars have been spent on their conservation. That might sound like a lot, but it is a total over many years. They depend on old growth rain forest, living [...]

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Is this a new problem or a sudden realization of an old one?

Whether it is or not, this issue is heating up in British Columbia and Alberta  The adult grizzlies are more likely to escape the wintertime dozers and other heavy equipment than the cubs, but the mortality rate of even adults is substantial. [...]

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U.S./B.C. herd of 50 to finally get critical habitat-

Woodland caribou, far more rare than the well known barren ground caribou, have kept a tiny toehold in the United States in the Panhandle of Idaho. Even that sometimes slips and the herd spends its time just to the north in British Columbia. About 600 square [...]

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This topic is not new here, but what about all those who blame the govmint?

Pine forests, especially lodgepole pine and whitebark pine are being killed by bark beetles at an incredible rate from the Yukon (that is not in the USA) to Mexico (not America either). There is controversy among scientists why the beetles [...]

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Once powerful Idaho timber lobby calls it quits after 75 years-

I remember when this interest group held enormous power, rivaling the livestock associations, although they were not rivals, of course.

Timber association will disband after 75 years. By Becky Kramer. Spokesman-Review.

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‎"At some point we must draw a line across the ground of our home and our being, drive a spear into the land and say to the bulldozers, earthmovers, government and corporations, “thus far and no further.” If we do not, we shall later feel, instead of pride, the regret of Thoreau, that good but overly-bookish man, who wrote, near the end of his life, “If I repent of anything it is likely to be my good behaviour."

~ Edward Abbey