Currently viewing the category: "Conservation"

Wildlife management reform objective two-

Recently we discussed the first objective in reforming the broken system of wildlife management we see in America today.  That was to restructure the state fish and game departments.  Here is the second:

2. Remove Grazing From All Federal Public Lands

Grazing […]

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This is a provocative essay  by Michael Vandeman written almost two decades ago, but given the increasing demand that various recreationalists as well as industry is demanding of our wildlands, it is worth considering some of the ideas that he articulates. Wildlife Need Habitat Off-Limits to Humans!
Michael J. Vandeman, Ph.D.
October 12, […]

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Wildlife management reform objective one-

Speak for Wolves is an opportunity for the American people to unite and demand wildlife management reform and restore our national heritage. This year’s event is set to take place in the Union Pacific Dining Lodge on August 7-9, 2015 in West Yellowstone, Montana.

Here […]

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Wyoming legislature considers a rancher grudge bill due to Western Watershed’s Jonathan Ratner-

By Ralph Maughan (opinion)

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Last year the Idaho Legislature passed an an overreaching “ag-gag” bill because an animal rights group had videoed some dairy workers abusing cattle. This came despite the the dairy ending up fined as […]

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“The Great Republican Land Heist: Cliven Bundy and the politicians who want to plunder the West”
Christopher Ketcham details the rancher/Republican grab for our outdoor heritage-

Cristopher Ketcham has been writing about the Western public lands now for a couple years. He is in the mold of Bernard DeVoto who wrote the influential column, […]

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Heather Tallis and Jane Lubchenco published a commentary  titled “A Call for Inclusive Conservation” in the November 2014 issue of Nature.  The essay sought to broker a truce or compromise between two philosophical positions in the conservation movement today that can be characterized as “new conservation” which promotes human utility as the primary goal of […]

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In a recent blog post, Defenders of Wildlife is grossly misleading the public claiming that they have “saved the last wild bison” by participating in and supporting the quarantine of buffalo that originated as wild calves from Yellowstone. Quarantine is a domestication process. There is no benefit from quarantine to bison as wildlife. Quarantine […]

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Literature and Conservation in the West

By Mark Bailey and Kirsten Allen

Ten years ago I sat down and read Michael Crichton’s novel State of Fear. While far from his best work, it was his usual roller coaster of a techno-thriller. And, rather strangely, it was blatantly Ayn Rand-like in its political speeches that attempted […]

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In a recent editorial in the Jackson Hole Guide, Luther Propst of Jackson asserts that conservationists needed to keep in mind that many public lands recreationalists have a common interest in protecting the land. (see Propts piece here http://www.jhnewsandguide.com/opinion/guest_shot/fun-hogs-and-the-future-of-conservation/article_f98a41a3-6dd0-5915-b166-fe0a5b898138.html) Recreationists like mountain biking proponents could be allies in efforts to protect wildlands as designated […]

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If the public really understood the illogic behind Forest Service management, including those endorsed by forest collaboratives, I am certain there would be more opposition to current Forest Service policies.

First, most FS timber sales lose money. They are a net loss to taxpayers. After the costs of road construction, sale layout and environmental analyses, […]

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Quote

‎"At some point we must draw a line across the ground of our home and our being, drive a spear into the land and say to the bulldozers, earthmovers, government and corporations, “thus far and no further.” If we do not, we shall later feel, instead of pride, the regret of Thoreau, that good but overly-bookish man, who wrote, near the end of his life, “If I repent of anything it is likely to be my good behaviour."

~ Edward Abbey